The Cry

The Cry is a psychological thriller that chronicles the collapse of a marriage in the aftermath of a tragedy and explores the myths and truths of motherhood.

Year: 2018

Directors: Glendyn Ivin

Producers: Brian Kaczynski, Stuart Menzies

Executive Producers: Claire Mundell, Elizabeth Kilgarriff, Gaynor Holmes

Screenwriter: Jacquelin Perske

Principal Cast: Jenna Coleman, Ewen Leslie, Asher Keddie, Moyo Akandé, Shareena Clanton, Kate Dickie, Alex Dimitriades, David Elliot

Synopsis

Joanna (Jenna Coleman) and Alistair (Ewen Leslie) are a young couple forced to face unthinkable circumstances under the white light of public scrutiny, changing their lives and their relationship forever.

Joanna and Alistair travel from Scotland to Australia with their baby son, Noah. They’re going to Melbourne to see Alistair’s mother Elizabeth and to fight for custody of Alistair’s 14 year-old daughter Chloe, from his previous marriage to Alexandra.

Joanna is struggling with life as a new mum and the flight to Melbourne is a huge additional strain on her. Noah cries the whole way, to the very apparent dismay of their fellow travellers.

Exhausted and emotional from the journey the couple finally arrive in Australia, where unforeseen events change their lives forever.

Produced by Synchronicity Films, The Cry was filmed in and around Glasgow and Melbourne, with funding support from Creative Scotland and Film Victoria.

The Cry is a four-part series, airing on BBC One at 9pm on Sunday evenings from 30 September to 16 October. All aired episodes are available to watch on BBC iPlayer.

Close Up of an upset Jenna Coleman in The Cry

Rave Reviews

“Jenna Coleman shines as an unravelling new mother” — The Independent give four stars to The Cry’s first episode, as they praise the depiction of parenthood in the thriller. The Guardian also give it four stars, calling The Cry “a baby-snatching drama that promises to be a worthy rival to Bodyguard.”

With another two four-star reviews, The Times say The Cry displays a “screaming agony of a parent’s worst nightmare”, while The i call it “a slick psychological drama to fill the gap left by Bodyguard… very different yet equally intriguing.”  

More praise for Jenna Coleman, The Daily Telegraph say she “shines” in an “intense study of early motherhood.”­­